the 48,000 acres of land that was to become San Simeon, where is son William built his famous castle.

 

Researchers generally characterize George Hearst as the humble father of an extensive mining and publishing empire, a popular, brilliant man. They are enamored with his money and success. What they fail to recognize is the extent of the underhanded, sometimes illegal, tactics and strategies he may have had to employ in order to acquire the land and all its mineral rights, in order to build that much-admired empire. (Hunter 2006)

 

While the analysis appears harsh in places, it is only the beginning of an ongoing investigation. Seven years after the initial analyses was written; documentation, two hundred sixty-nine years old, supporting the observations, avocations, predictions and conjectures has surfaced to confirm their authenticity as legitimate strategies for cultural change and legal pandering to the railroads, mining and banking interest…under the guise of social/cultural evolution. In other words, authors like Adam Kuper and Elisabeth Tooker, as anthropologists, are on the right track in their observations of Morgan. However, because of the scientific theme of Morgan’s research and the organized presentation of the dazzling data, which disguises the legal purpose and devastating ramifications of Morgan’s research the truth eludes them.

 

The lines between Social and Cultural anthropology, Victorian and Boasian theory are obscure only by the academic illusions created by misunderstanding and misquoting Morgan and his real-world intent. The liberalized conjecture of a utopian world developed out of Morgan’s comparison of ancient laws, customs and traditions are exactly what they appear…a fantasy…the devastation reeked upon the American Indian and this Nation are as real as it gets.

 

The following represents the truth, a limited Native American History, written in stone, as closely as this investigator has yet been able to ascertain…