These observations, by Earle provide evidence that in fact, a group of researchers attempted to manipulate their results to produce an outcome more favorable to their benefactors.

 

“Ethnographers working in the early twentieth century attempted to reconstruct formerly existing authentic native political institutions for these Western groups through the obscuring filter of the new political order” ... (Earle 2004)

 

 

Earle even speaks in opposition to Kroeber when he writes, “It should be kept in mind...that a group called the Desert Mohave may have occupied portions of Fort Irwin, the Mojave River, the New York-Providence Mountains region and other adjacent areas”...Kroeber professed the story of the Desert Mohave to be “fantasy-history” ... “Kroeber also emphasized the point that the Chemehuevi occupation of the west bank of the Colorado River was not at all ancient” ... while “Isabel Kelly’s Chemehuevi elder informants referred to an almost dizzying succession of wars and truces between the Mohave and Chemehuevi for decades before 1870”. (Earle 2004)

 

The truth is; Indians are not, and were not, the drugged out super peaceniks or conservationists that many cultural anthropologists have contrived to have everyone believe. The fact is that from Maine to Southern California, many ancient tribes could have; and did, field up to ten thousand fighting men for an intertribal war and that they were masters of the cost/benefit analysis business model long before the Europeans arrived.

 

Regional tribes, identified by their language stock, consisted of smaller groups, which specialized in specific functional areas such as agriculture, hunting, weapons production and warfare in order to support an equivalent to our modern day standing armies.  Like modern America, the tribes were peaceful, except when they were at war, which unfortunately was a lot more than everyone has been taught in our modern day colleges or universities.  Teachings based upon an illusionary cultural agenda designed for the specific purpose of eliminating all memory of advanced Indian society and history, as expressed in this author’s research notes:

 

"Morgan’s first objective was to downgrade the Aztec from the highly advanced society expressed in the opinions of William H. Prescott and Hubert H. Bancroft for the Aztec Empire, its political structure, civilization and architecture... Morgan degraded these assessments vigorously; he demoted Montezuma to a village chief and dictated that all Indians lived in small villages, because they were never organized into larger, regional groups capable of any unified action or purpose beyond trade. These same attitudes were carried forward by Bandelier, Hewett: even later by Kroeber, Steward and